L.C. Wright

Author

What Does It Take To Be A Writer?

That question was posed to me recently and I got to thinking about it…a lot.

The idea of being a writer is more than the simple task of putting a string of words together. And frankly, I think the question had more to do with the idea of what a person has to do to be a serious writer. So that is what I will attempt to write about today.

However, before I can do that, I must first dissect the issue of what the words “serious writer” means. Do you want to write stories to share with friends and family? Are you trying to write a book? Do you consider yourself the next literary genius to come down the pike? Do you want to get published? Do you want to sell a million books? What does being a serious writer entail?

If you can answer those questions then maybe my simple explanation will help.

Being a serious writer means work. You have to work at the craft. It’s learning the difference between “part time” and “spare time.” It is a rare person that has the luxury of writing on a fulltime basis. If you do, then consider yourself to fortunate. However, if you are like the majority of us, we have to write in addition to everything else that might be required.

Most people who want to write and fail, do so because they allow life to get in the way of their success. They start a story and then, as time goes forward, a spouse or child will ask you to do something that they believe is more important than what you are doing. They don’t—can’t—understand the passion for the written word that is boiling inside you. They consider it a hobby to be tolerated, not something to take serious. It’s up to you to NEVER accept their idea of what’s important. Learn to say no or not now.

Most important (drum roll please) sit down and write every day. Make it a habit. Accept nothing less than “X” number of words every day that you write. (For me it’s 500 words.) If you do that, you will accomplish more than you could possibly imagine. Give it try. Try it for one month—30 days. You will be amazed.

I wish you nothing but the best success. And if you have any comments or suggestion, please let me know.

 

To read Castle Grey – A Katt and Mouse Mystery, Click here (Kindle) or here (Paperback)

2 Comments

  1. Some great advice.

    To put things in perspective, if the writer maintains the habit for 30 days, they’ll wind up with 30K words. The average word count for a first time novel is usually between 80K – 120K. Which means by the end of the month, the writer is potentially a little under half-way done.

    There’s also the added benefit of getting faster with practice. When I first started writing I managed 500 words per hour, these days I average 1,500 word per hour.

    • Lannie

      October 23, 2013 at 9:51 pm

      You are correct. Sometimes all it takes is just a little push to get someone going in the right direction. Just think about it. If you took the time to get that far on your first novel, the odds of stopping at that time is slim. It just takes a little every day to make it work.

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  1. philip

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